An Interview with Little Comets

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I’m thrilled to give you all this post! Little Comets, an English indie-rock band that formed in 2008, have been one of my favorite bands since high school. I’m ecstatic to have interviewed lead singer, Rob Coles, for my blog.

Little Comets, made up of brothers Rob and Michael Coles, plus friends Matthew Hall, Matt Saxon, and Nathan Greene, released their debut album, In Search of Elusive Little Comets in 2011. The next year, the band released their second album, Life is Elsewhere, (my favorite!) under Dirty Hit records. If you’re unfamiliar with Dirty Hit, they’re an award-winning, British, independent label (and happen to be my favorite record label), whose artists include The 1975, Pale Waves, Wolf Alice, The Japanese House, and more. Little Comets were signed with Dirty Hit until 2017. They independently released their third album, Worhead, that same year.

Matty Healy of The 1975 mentioned his friendship with the guys in an 2013 interview.  Little Comets even helped produce some of The 1975’s early tracks.

“Little Comets took us out on the road when we were in our very embryonic stages of our old band and just let us open up for them. We started getting fans off the back of that…Then they helped us produce ‘Sex’ the song, and ‘You,'” -Matty Healy

I discovered Little Comets in 2013 when they performed a show at a small, intimate venue in Portland. I got tickets to the show out of curiosity, and after just a few minutes, I fell in love with the band’s unique sound. Echoey, driving drums, beachy guitar riffs and vivid lyrics that can be interpreted in a variety of ways…that’s Little Comets.

Little Comets started out by playing small college gigs, cafes, and other unusual venues in the UK. Since then, the guys have come a long way. Just this last year, the band teamed up with Catfish and the Bottlemen (another fave band of mine) for a sold-out arena tour. After that, the band spent the winter writing and working on new music in none other than singer Frank Sinatra’s former summer home in California! These days, album number five is in the works, and the guys are planning out their next tour–it will be the first time they’ve hit the road in two years.

A Perfect Playlist: Tell me a little bit about how Little Comets got started. Have you all been involved in music-related projects since you were young?

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Little Comets (Rob Coles): Mickey are I brothers, so we’ve been writing songs in the house since we were very little. Once we’d finished Uni, we decided to see if we could make a living out of being creative, musically, so we set about finding other musicians to form a band. That was the start of Little Comets with Mark (our original drummer), and Matt, our bassist.

APP: One of my favorite songs of yours is “Bridge Burn.” It’s a super special song for me and a few friends. Can you tell me a little bit about the story behind it?

RC: Ah thanks, that’s nice to hear! That’s a song I wrote in my bedroom while Mickey was mixing songs for our second album. I kind of wrote/recorded it roughly and had lots of lyrics almost immediately for it. The coast is pretty great for providing lyrical metaphors. Theme-wise, it’s just about two people who realize that their time is up. When Mickey heard the song, he really molded the landscape. Initially, it was just a B-side, but in hindsight, we probably should have put a little more faith in it, as it seems to be a pretty popular song.

APP: Your sound/genre has been described as “kitchen sink indie.” Do you agree with that?

RC: Haha, I don’t really mind–as long as people are polite and constructive, they can describe our sound how they like. I suppose that it could mean, in terms of subject matter, that we write about kitchen sink-related things, which was certainly true of album one. In a sonic sense, though, we do use a lot of percussive instruments which are also kitchenalia, so if the cap fits…

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APP: If you could invite one artist/band to be in the crowd at one of your shows, who would it be and why?

RC: We got really excited once at a gig in Oxford because somebody asked that Jonny Greenwood (Radiohead) be put on the guest list. It spoilt the gig, though, because we spent the whole evening looking for Jonny Greenwood despite him not actually being there, and probably never having any intention of being there. So I would choose Jonny Greenwood because I haven’t said “Jonny Greenwood” enough in this answer.

APP: Your latest music video, “American Tuna,” is super creative and visually complex in how it was filmed. Can you tell me a little bit about your experience filming? How did you come up with the idea as it relates to the song?

RC: It was fun, but stressful. We had received an email telling us, despite our very polite request, that we explicitly couldn’t use the building. So the whole process was based around being very secretive. This definitely hampered the final product, as we couldn’t redo shots or control timing or lighting. Mickey was in a Paternoster lift in an 18-floor building with the camera. As the lift travels up, each floor is a different scene which tells the story of a relationship. Mickey was in that lift for about 6 solid hours while we chased him ’round the building, doing scenes in non-chronological order to avoid security cameras. We were happy with the final video, but I just wish that people could see the levels of effort and time that just three people were involved in executing. It looks pretty pro, and the DIYness doesn’t come through. I think that given the constraints, it’s amazing. But I’m biased.

APP: That’s mind-blowing. Writing music is super different from filming a visual interpretation of a song through a music video. Has that ever been a challenge for you as a band?

RC:  I think we’ve learned to separate the processes quite naturally. We also like learning new skills, so the challenge of making a video or a piece of artwork is an opportunity to do that. The only problem is time. We are three people, yet we have to record, write, and release the music on our own label, then promote it whilst making the videos and artwork. Because we are novices in many of these areas, it takes us longer to produce these assets. That often puts us behind, as artists at a commensurate level have teams of people and pools of financial resources that we don’t. It does make the task psychologically difficult at times as well, compounded by the fact that we are in a industry that gives credence to having a machine in tow. We often get overlooked and dismissed because we don’t have a manager, record label, publisher, art director, plugging team etc. I think this is where the real challenge lies for us.

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APP: You haven’t toured for two years, but you’re making plans to head back onto the road soon! Do you have a favorite/funny memory from being on tour in the past?

RC: Probably when Matt broke his foot in Texas. We spent the next five days telling him he was fine, but then talking privately about how he was really hamming it up. By the time we got to Missouri, he got an X-ray and found out he had a hairline fracture. We felt TERRIBLE! He completed the rest of the tour perched on a bar stool during the gigs, and he became my hero.

APP: Are there any songs you feel you’ve outgrown that now seem to stray from your current sound?

RC: Ah no, they are all our babies. They popped out for a reason and we can’t really turn them away even when they become slightly haggard/annoying. That would be bad song parenting!

 

Thanks for taking the time to chat with me, Rob!

Listen to Little Comets here:

 

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Album Review: Nathan Sykes’ “Unfinished Business”

nathan-sykes-reveals-unfinished-business-album-artwork-01I’m so excited to finally write this post! Nathan Sykes has been a favorite of mine since I was thirteen years old and he was a part of my most favorite band at the time, The Wanted. I’ve so enjoyed watching him grow and evolve as a solo artist since then.

The Wanted were an Irish-British-pop band formed in 2010 made up of members Nathan Sykes, Siva Kaneswaran, Jay McGuiness, Max George, and Tom Parker. (I’ve been following this band since my love for them in middle school, so I don’t even need to research any of this information.) After five successful years, the band decided to take a break from making music together and pursue their own careers in various fields. Since then, all the boys have succeeded in one way or another–and for Nathan, his biggest accomplishment so far has been releasing his own, debut record.

Nathan has a unique vocal style that ranges from pop, R&B to soul-sounding. He never sings one song the same way each time, and his incredibly raw, natural talent really comes through in this record–he sounds exactly as he does in his live shows, which showcases rare, amazing talent. (I’ve seen him twice, and met him two different times.) Check out the live version of his single “Famous” below. (And if you want to see videos of Nathan singing live last summer in Portland & me chatting with him, click here.)

This album, “Unfinished Business,” is an incredibly strong debut. With a variety of songs ranging from ballads, electro-pop bangers, to jazzy, trumpet-filled anthems, this record has something for everyone.

img_8317The first track on this album is a great introduction to Nathan’s new style–“Good Things Come To Those Who Wait.” This upbeat, trumpet-and-drum-infused tune features a choir accompanying Nathan, which sounds incredible. (Reminds me a bit of the style The 1975 have been incorporating into their new music–especially with songs like “If I Believe You.”) (Photo on right taken by me.)

A few of the most memorable tracks on this record are: “I’ll Remember You,” “Famous,” “There’s Only One Of You,” (this one is very John Mayer-esque), “Twist,” and “Tears In The Rain.” This new album also features a few familiar faces/voices such as rapper G-Eazy and singer-songwriter Ariana Grande.

nathNathan did a bit of touring last summer in the U.K. and U.S. to promote his upcoming album, and is planning to do another tour (most likely early next year) now that it’s released. I had the pleasure of chatting with him before his show in PDX last summer, and it was a pretty cool experience to discuss this record with him. (Plus, he’s just a funny and very sweet guy.) I tried to coax the title of the new album out of him before it had been announced, but he stubbornly refused, telling me that I “probably already know the name of the record and just don’t realize it.” 😉 Nathan also talked about how much this record means to him–he put his heart and soul into producing it, and has poured his memories and experiences into each and every song. This album is just as good as I hoped it would be. I  highly recommend checking out Nathan’s music if you’re into artists like Charlie Puth, Union J, or Olly Murs. (Picture on the left: me and Nathan!)

Nathan’s album is available on CD, vinyl, and through most streaming sites. Take a listen here!

Nina Nesbitt’s “Songs I’m Writing For You” Project

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One of my favorite UK female artists, Nina Nesbitt, recently came up with an idea that brings fans even closer to her music. I absolutely love the idea, and I thought I’d write a little blog post about it. I encourage you to check out a few of the songs she recently released for her project “Songs I’m Writing For You.” 🙂 (Photo on the left by Drew Fawkes)

Nina’s idea allows fans to submit personal stories to her, which she then transforms into songs. Fans sent a variety of stories; from breakups, dark/happy times in their lives, and tales of the people and things that mean most to them. Additionally, Nina asked fans to send bits and pieces of details that could help her translate their story into a song, such as memories of particular smells, sensations, colors, and visuals that relate to their experience. I think this is such an incredible way to incorporate the fans into her music–fans will treasure these songs Nina has written for them for the rest of their lives, and I love the idea that she is translating their thoughts and emotions into a song, which is really difficult for people who love music but can’t write their own (like me, haha) to do.

ninaSo far, Nina has released two tracks that were derived from stories submitted by fans: “Ontario,” and “Brisbane.” The titles refer to the places around the world in which the fans live, and where the stories take place. “Ontario” tells the heartbreaking story of two friends who begin to blur the lines between friendship and something more, taking place in a crowded house party where jealousy, lust, and sadness begin to taint their developing relationship. “Brisbane,” however, follows the story of a girl’s close relationship with her aging father. The young girl worries her memories of her father will fade after he has passed, and wonders if she will lose a piece of herself when she loses him someday.

After releasing these tracks, Nina has continued to use this project to give back to her fans. After the release of “Ontario,” Nina put a number of limited edition CDs for sale on her website which were not only all autographed, but also featured a unique lyric from the single written on each of the sleeves.

ninaI just want to take a moment to acknowledge the incredible amount of effort Nina has made over the years in connecting with her fans across the world. She is constantly giving fans the opportunity to be involved in her projects, whether that means helping her write new songs, or submitting pictures of them wearing her merchandise for a chance to be featured on her website. So cool, and such a great way to gain life-long fans.

I’m so excited to see what songs Nina will release next based on fan submissions! In the meantime, though, “Brisbane” and “Ontario” are currently on repeat. Thanks for all the cool things you do for your fans, Nina! 🙂

Track-By-Track Review: The 1975’s New Album

IMG_8442Photo by Sophie Cettina

The 1975’s much-anticipated new record, “I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware of It,” came out on February 26. I grabbed a copy as soon as possible, and thanks to my amazing boss at the record store I work in back home, I even got a signed booklet from the band! (See at the bottom of the post.)

CGW08WCWoAEqvDiLast summer, The 1975 tweeted a few mysterious, cryptic comic book strips that stirred up controversy. The band seemed to be hinting at an ending of some sort, perhaps even the band’s end. After a few weeks, though, Matty (lead singer) revealed that the band was not breaking up, but instead, redefining their musical style & visual aesthetic. (Concert photos taken by me.)

Before this new record, the band avoided pop-like songs, overlystylized music videos and cheerful themes in their music. Additionally, the band members wore black clothing on stage and tended to post all their photos on social media with an added black and white filter. On the new album, though, each song features a hint of pop, even blues, and numerous other musical styles.

In addition to their new musical style, the band’s stage setup has changed. From dark, gloomy lighting to vibrant pinks, blues, and greens, complete with multi-colored neon rectangles to represent the band’s original trademark, their overall style has completely changed to imitate an 80s-90s aesthetic.

IMG_8410Photo by Sophie Cettina

To be honest, I was skeptical about the news regarding the band’s dramatic change. One of the reasons I love The 1975 is because they are unlike any other band in the music industry today–their lyrics are brilliant, and they certainly don’t look like any other bands to which I listen. Luckily, though, Matty and the boys didn’t disappoint with their new record–their new style is refreshing and still just as good (if not better) than their previous album. Here is my individual review of each track.

CckRhUVW4AAlM0J1. The 1975: The track begins with an slow increase in volume through a flurry of synthesizer and space-like sounds. The song comes to a sudden stop, and then Matty enters, accompanied by a choir. This first song is also the first track on their debut album, and I love the idea of using this song as the opening to their sophomore album, as well. My favorite lines are: “Soft sound. Midnight. Car lights. Playing with the air. Breathing in your hair.” Through headphones, it sounds as if the song itself is drawing closer and closer in its beginning, about to burst your eardrums, until the soft pause in anticipation of Matty and the choir. It’s a perfect introduction to the overall record as it ushers into the wild guitar riffs of “Love Me.”

CckwP8AWAAAZEKn2. Love Me: With stunning guitar solos and fiery synthesizers, this song really strays from the band’s previous style. The guys released this track as a single a few months ago, and eventually paired it with a ground-breaking, style-defining video in which Matty is seen wearing heavy makeup (including lipstick and eye shadow) on an 80s themed, purple-and blue-light-bathed set. Throughout the video, Matty drinks sloppily out of a wine bottle (nothing new here) and proceeds to make out and dance with various celebrity cut-outs. I love the song. At first, I was unsure about it…especially considering the atypical intro. But the song eventually grew on me. By far, my favorite line in the song is: “You look famous, let’s be friends and portray we possess something important…and do the things we like, meaning we’ve just come to represent a decline in the standards are what we accept! Yeah, yeah, Yeah…no.” Matty never ceases to impress me with his witty songwriting as he subtly (or sometimes not so subtly) critiques social issues.

CckzrAnXEAAMQSS3. UGH! I’m obsessed with the intro to this song. The bass and guitar, mixed with Matty’s voice is absolutely perfect. It has an 80s-90s feel to it, which is such a fresh sound right now. The song title is also pretty quirky. Matty doesn’t say “ugh” at any point in the song, but it makes so much sense as the title. The song seems to be about a relationship that has ended, yet Matty can’t help falling in love with the girl a second time–hence the lyric: “and you’re the only thing that’s going on in my mind…taking over my life a second time. I don’t have the capacity for fucking…You’re meant to be helping me.” The word “ugh” pretty much sums up this situation–the phrase could really have either a positive or negative connotation, and it’s up to the listener to define which. “UGH!” is short and sweet, gracing your headphones for a duration of only three minutes.

Cck0eUdW0AIiK-i4. A Change of Heart: This echoey ballad  always makes me visualize the color purple, for some odd reason. A deep, rich purple. Through out the song, there are many references to The 1975’s previous record, and they even seem to continue the story of “Robbers,” my favorite track off their first album. The song surveys the story of a man who loves woman so much that he can barely function without her, even if the relationship is seemingly toxic. As a “A Change Of Heart” progresses, however, Matty does just that…he realizes that doesn’t love the girl anymore…and for no particular reason, really. “You used to have a face straight out of a magazine, now you just look like anyone.” (In contrast to the lyrics of “Robbers:” “She had a face straight outta magazine. God only knows but you’ll never leave her.”) This song really depicts a modern relationship–there is no sugar-coating, and it’s all very realistic.

she's american5. She’s American: This track starts off calm and dreamy, and then immediately leads in with intense drums, guitars, and synthesizers. Out of all the tracks on the new record, this one sounds the most like the band’s previous, classic style. The guitar in this song is truly the best addition, fading in and out with the song to emphasize each lyric. My favorite lines in the song are: “She’s inducing sleep to avoid pain,”and “Don’t fall in love with the moment, and think you’re in love with the girl.” The song seems to follow the band’s relationship with their fans, especially since American girls adore Matty, a man from Manchester. The lyrics, “If she likes it ’cause we just don’t eat, and we’re so intelligent, she’s American. If she says I’ve got to fix my teeth, then she’s so American. And if she likes it ’cause we just don’t eat, and we’re socially relevant, she’s American,” seems to point out the stereotypes often associated with British and American people–Americans tend to eat larger amounts, and English people are sometimes viewed to be seemingly more “intelligent” due to their accents. Additionally, Matty emphasizes that the British are “socially relevant” right now, with so many girls falling in love British boy bands. (Very relatable to me!)

if i believe you6. If I Believe You: This track is the most notable on the album. The 1975 have completely outdone themselves with this song–with an amazing backup choir that belts out tight, sharp choruses to emphasize particular lines, the track is heavily influenced by gospel music. Lyrically, the song is fascinating as well. It seems to represent Matty’s inner monologue surrounding his opinions and beliefs on religion. Matty sings: “And if I believe you…will that make it stop? If I told you I need you…is that what you want? And I’m broken and bleeding. And begging for help. And I’m asking you Jesus, show yourself.” In the song, he expresses his struggle to find God (or some sort of higher power) in order to stop the pain going through his mind. He wonders if admitting to God that he needs Him is the key to receiving His help. The song really marks a new style for the band…it features a trumpet, which is the last thing you’d expect to hear on a 1975 record.

Cck30mBWwAA21XF7. Please Be Naked: This is another one of The 1975’s dreamy, lengthy songs in which they  manage to convey emotion and ideas mostly through noise and various instruments. It is entirely instrumental, and seems to rise in sound and intensity as the song progresses as if depicting the image of passion and love. The piano on this track is beautiful–the intro to the song which features a swirl of soft keys is breathtaking. Eventually, the keys lead into a sort of spacey, bell-like chorus.

Cck47Q-XEAAHZTR8. Lostmyhead: Matty writes quite a few songs about the inner workings of his brain, as well as instances where he’s felt he’s “lost his head.” This is a common theme in The 1975’s music–Matty always seems to be trying to find himself, his purpose, or his “brain” through music. “Lostmyhead” is probably my least favorite song on the record, though. It’s a bit of sensory overload. There is a lot of static and loud blares on the track, which is probably meant to predict and portray the sounds of the inner ramblings of someone’s (perhaps Matty’s) brain.

Cck6KEOXIAAG8v_9. The Ballad Of Me and My Brain: This track is truly a lovely mix of the old and new 1975. The song begins with the oohs and ahhs of the choir, and leads into Matty screaming at the top of his lungs about going mad. This track follows the continued theme of Matty losing his brain, but in this song, his brain is personified: “And what a shame you’ve lost a brain that you never had. Oh mum check the car, it can’t have gone far. I must have left it on a train or lost in a bar. It’s likely in a Sainsbury’s, flirting with the girls and waiting for me. I jumped on a bus, declared my name, and asked if anybody’s seen my brain.” The song seems to suggest Matty’s loss of control over his brain and his actions as his band continues to grow in popularity. This song is really well written, and Matty’s emotion, frustration, and sense of deliriousness really comes through.

Cck66FKW8AAAUNi10. Somebody Else: This is one of those songs that really tugs at your heartstrings. It’s about painful feelings and thoughts after going through a breakup: you don’t want the person anymore, but it kills you to see them with someone else once they’ve moved on. This is an extremely emotional ballad, which features great electric keyboard, guitar, and synthesizer. The majority of the track is somber, slow and melancholy, but eventually ends in Matty singing angrily: “Get someone you love? Get someone you need? Fuck that, get money. I can’t give you my soul cause we’re never alone!” The repetitive line that is interwoven through out the entire track, “I don’t want your body…but I hate to think about you with somebody else,” is so simple yet so powerful.

Cck7x7EXIAAG3l-11. Loving Someone: This is one track on the album that disappointed me a bit–it’s too electric-pop for my taste. Although I may not love the song, the spoken word which is featured in the middle of the track is brilliantly written, and truly thought-provoking: “She blazed about how cultural language is an operation system. A simple interface rendered feeble and listless. When tested with a divinity or a true understanding of the human condition I never did understand – the duality of art and reality – living life and treating it as such but with a certain disconnect.” It’s definitely worth your time to stop and listen to this one for it’s spoken word addition.

Cck8scsW4AAtjS-12. I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It:  In a recent interview, Matty explained that this phrase was something he whispered to an ex-girlfriend one morning. He thought it was an interesting concept, so he wrote it down, then used it as a song title. He explained that the phrase makes him feel a little uneasy, which he believes is a good thing, explains why he decided to make it the name of the overall record. You can’t always be 100% sure about everything when it comes to writing music. This song is another completely instrumental track on the record, and definitely imitates sleep, dreaming, and love with its ambient noises and instruments. The ending of this song is heartbreakingly beautiful. Matty sings: “Before you go, (please don’t go) turn the big light off.”

the sound13. The Sound: Initially released as a single before the band’s album release, this song is a declaration of the band’s separation from their previous style. In a recent BBC 1 interview, Matty said: “It wears its pop on its sleeve and it’s kind of unabashed. There hasn’t been a vehicle yet for us to do that. This album is perfect [for the song] because it’s juxtaposed with everything the album is.”  This song includes a killer guitar solo from lead guitarist Adam Hann, and and intro that builds up into a burst of piano, quick guitar, drums, and Matty’s brilliant voice. My favorite line is: “It’s not about reciprocation, it’s just all about me: a sycophantic, prophetic, Socratic junkie wannabe. There’s so much skin to see…a simple Epicurean philosophy. And you say I’m such a cliché. I can’t see the difference in it either way.”

Cck_ZYgW8AARxR014. This Must Be My Dream: I love the guitar in this track, as well as the strong chorus that brings the choir back in. The song seems to illustrate a relationship that is too good to be true–it must be a dream. As the song progresses, it becomes clear that it is, in fact, too good to be true. Matty sings: “Pipe down, you’re no lover. It’s failing cos’ you want it to. Well, I thought it was love but I guess I must be dreaming ’bout feeling something instead of you.” I was so excited to find that this song features The 1975’s brilliantly talented saxophone player, John Waugh, whom I met in April 2014.

CclAXBCWAAAXUae15. Paris: It took Matty about a year to write this song, which is fascinating to me, since it’s not a song about complex breakup or relationship, but rather about a city with which he’s fallen in love. And no, it was not written during the time of the attacks on Paris. Matty wrote this song because of his adoration for Paris, and in a recent interview he said: “I’m writing about a city I love, and that’s what I’m going to remember, I won’t let Paris be defined by that (the attacks).”

The song is a dreamy ballad with echoing choruses, and repetitive guitar riffs that flow through the entire song. The track seems to follow the story of a girl who is abusing drugs: “you’re a walking overdose in a great coat…” The song truly tells a story, and there are a few incredible lines that made me actually stop to Google a few of the words used. For example, Matty sings: “There was a party that you had to miss because your friend kept cutting her wrists. Hyper-politicized sexual trysts. ‘Oh, I think my boyfriend’s a nihilist.’ I said ‘Hey kids we’re all just the same…what a shame.'” Thanks to the Internet, I discovered that “nihilists” believe that all values are baseless, and nothing in the world can truly be known. Nihilism is often associated with extreme pessimism. It is fascinating to me that Matty embedded this word in the story of the song…perhaps he is struggling with a bit of nihilism himself–pessimistic views commonly come through his music. Next to “If I Believe You,” this is one of my absolute favorites off the record.

be0b1a6e0b9b1b58ef035e966c352277.1000x666x116. Nana: This is the most heart-wrenching track on the record. Matty was extremely close to his Nana, (Annie) and still struggles in coping with her death, which is why he wrote this song. The track is simple, but conveys so much emotion. Matty doesn’t dance around the concept of death in his music–he flat out acknowledges it, as painful as it may be. After all, death is unapologetic in itself. In “Nana,” he sings: “Oh sleepless nights, a grown up man dressed in white, who I thought might just save your life…but he couldn’t, so you died.” In the very last few lines of the song in which Matty sings: “But I’m bereft you see. I think you can tell…I haven’t been doing too well,” the singer’s voice cracks with emotion, as if on the brink of tears. This song is so moving, touching, and in the end, simply gut-wrenching.

CclCm4bW4AAro5Q17. She Lays Down: This track is entirely acoustic, complete with chatterings from the band before/after the song finishes. The song is intriguing; it seems to highlight the story of a young woman who so desperately wants to love a man…but just can’t bring herself to. He’s everything she wants, but she simply doesn’t love him in the same way he loves her. Just like most typical 1975 songs, the track touches on the negative effects of drugs and the part they play in relationships. This track is completely stripped, exclusively featuring acoustic guitar and Matty’s raw singing voice. (Update 1/13/17: Matty has disclosed that this song is about his mother and her struggle to raise him.)

Thanks for reading this far. Hope you enjoyed my review! Please feel free to tweet me your thoughts and opinions on the record as well. 🙂

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