Emo Meets Folk: A Chat with Alex Wieringa From Rare Candy

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“The best gigs happen when people are screaming lyrics back in my face,” says Alex Wieringa, front man of Rare Candy. The Chicago-based band, which Alex started when he was just a teenager, has developed a distinctive sound over time that blurs the line between punk-rock and folk. I discovered Rare Candy’s various EPs on Spotify last month, and I’ve been hooked ever since. (I’d even go so far as to say that RC is my fave band right now.) For this week’s post, I chatted with Alex about his skillful songwriting, inspiration, and newly found place in the emo genre.

A Perfect Playlist: Tell me a little bit about how you got started. How long have you been singing?

Alex Wieringa (Rare Candy): Rare Candy began as a solo passion project of songs that didn’t “fit the mold” of a previous band I’d been in. I was in my school choir from preschool until 8th grade, then I started playing real shows by myself when I was 19.

APP: You have a super unique sound. How would you define your genre?

AW: I’ve been tagging Rare Candy as a “folk-pop” band, and it seems to fit pretty well. I began playing in more pop-punk influenced band when in high school, but always had fun playing more blues and folk-style guitar. My uncle played in blues and country bands for as long as I could remember, so it was something that was familiar to me. Those two influences seemed to just mesh and come together naturally.

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APP: I’ve read in a few different places that Rare Candy fits into a new wave of emo music. Are there specific artists, emo or not, that have inspired you over the years?

AW: I think that Rare Candy unintentionally fits into the emo genre. The vibe of my music takes a direction that has been seen in bands like Modern Baseball and The Front Bottoms, to name a few recent groups. I also took influence from bands such as Go Radio and Nevershoutnever when I was younger. I very much enjoy pushing what I can do guitar-wise in order to spice up the instrumentals on a more straight-forward melody. I’ve been a big fan of The White Stripes/Jack White, The Milk Carton Kids, and The Tallest Man on Earth for some time now, all of which have influenced my guitar playing.

APP: Your most popular single, “If You See Her, Tell Her I’m Over It” is one of my favorites. The song is pretty self-explanatory, so I won’t ask you what it’s about. But if you had to sum it up in one sentence, what would you say?

AW: In one sentence: “I’m definitely not over it, but I very much want to be, so I’m going to fake it till I make it.” (P.S. It’s all love now, though.)

“You’re the kind of girl that makes me wish that I had never even met you. I miss you every day, and even though you’re not around I don’t resent you.”

APP: Each of your songs is its own story. Is there one song/story that means the most to you?

alex guitarAW: There are a few songs that I hold very close to me. “Sweet Potato Taco” got its name when my two best friends and I were taking a break from recording and we had, you guessed it, sweet potato tacos. But it was also written at a time where I was missing someone dear to me and it is undoubtedly one of the most positive and happy songs I’ve written. “Swatch Dogs and Diet Coke Heads” is probably one of my favorite stories. It’s just a very powerful realization of not blaming myself for things that go wrong, and a story of moving forward and sharing blame. These are two songs that stray from my usual “sad as fuck” vibe.

APP: Fave movie soundtrack?

AW: “Tarzan.” Phil Colins is an absolute madman. He could write a song about anything and still twist your heart into pieces while making you want to sing along to every word.

APP: There are a few of your songs that have flat-out made me cry. Your lyrics, which convey specific stories and experiences, are also incredibly relatable. When you’re writing a new song, how do you hone in on that emotional aspect of the story and craft a song?

AW: Thank you so much, I’m flattered. I always do my best to never force lyrics or a song idea. In order to keep my stuff genuine, I immediately jot down any interesting ideas I come up with. Sometimes, I’ll bang out an idea in an hour. Other times, a song will take weeks. Being patient gets stressful and annoying, especially when I’m sitting on one song for so long, but it’s the key to my writing. I always write what I would want to listen to had I been going through the same situation from an outside perspective. I enjoy my own songs very much, which makes it that much more fun and easy to say what I want to.

APP: Tell me a little bit about your latest record, Turnip Head. Where did the name come from?

AW: The songs on Turnip Head were all written around the same time. The song “Dry Clean only” very much would have fit on the earlier EP, Cream Soda, but the rest of the songs are much more mature in guitar style and in lyrical content.

“Turnip Head” is the name of a character from the movie “Howl’s Moving Castle” by Hayao Miyazaki. Miyazaki introduces the character as an enchanted Scarecrow who follows Sophie, the protagonist, along on her journey. He’s always silent and bouncing around, lending a hand while he can. We find out later that he was cursed and far from his homeland, and also that he’s in love with Sophie. Long story short, I thought he was a cute concept and related to him in an odd way. A long journey and a happy ending.

APP: Fave song lyric of yours?

AW: My favorite lyric I’ve written is: “you always hated being woken up, I should have spoken up and said just what was on my mind that day you packed your things,” from “Queen of Autumn.” It’s just very intimate, genuine and vulnerable. The entirety of that song is such a tender topic and heavy situation. The lyric “are you living, or just trying to stay alive?” also hits home. My favorite line to perform is: “I know I said I’d call but to be honest I just got a little faded.” Because lol true. Plus, I always scream it at the top of my lungs every time, and normally the crowd does too.

APP: What’s next for Rare Candy? Are you working on a new record/planning to tour soon?

AW: I’m writing all the time. I have a new single in the works simply for the sake of steadily releasing material. A small tour is coming up in the winter, and then more recording next year. Always keeping busy for sure.

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Thanks so much, Alex!

Find Rare Candy:

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An Interview with Little Comets

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I’m thrilled to give you all this post! Little Comets, an English indie-rock band that formed in 2008, have been one of my favorite bands since high school. I’m ecstatic to have interviewed lead singer, Rob Coles, for my blog.

Little Comets, made up of brothers Rob and Michael Coles, plus friends Matthew Hall, Matt Saxon, and Nathan Greene, released their debut album, In Search of Elusive Little Comets in 2011. The next year, the band released their second album, Life is Elsewhere, (my favorite!) under Dirty Hit records. If you’re unfamiliar with Dirty Hit, they’re an award-winning, British, independent label (and happen to be my favorite record label), whose artists include The 1975, Pale Waves, Wolf Alice, The Japanese House, and more. Little Comets were signed with Dirty Hit until 2017. They independently released their third album, Worhead, that same year.

Matty Healy of The 1975 mentioned his friendship with the guys in an 2013 interview.  Little Comets even helped produce some of The 1975’s early tracks.

“Little Comets took us out on the road when we were in our very embryonic stages of our old band and just let us open up for them. We started getting fans off the back of that…Then they helped us produce ‘Sex’ the song, and ‘You,'” -Matty Healy

I discovered Little Comets in 2013 when they performed a show at a small, intimate venue in Portland. I got tickets to the show out of curiosity, and after just a few minutes, I fell in love with the band’s unique sound. Echoey, driving drums, beachy guitar riffs and vivid lyrics that can be interpreted in a variety of ways…that’s Little Comets.

Little Comets started out by playing small college gigs, cafes, and other unusual venues in the UK. Since then, the guys have come a long way. Just this last year, the band teamed up with Catfish and the Bottlemen (another fave band of mine) for a sold-out arena tour. After that, the band spent the winter writing and working on new music in none other than singer Frank Sinatra’s former summer home in California! These days, album number five is in the works, and the guys are planning out their next tour–it will be the first time they’ve hit the road in two years.

A Perfect Playlist: Tell me a little bit about how Little Comets got started. Have you all been involved in music-related projects since you were young?

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Little Comets (Rob Coles): Mickey are I brothers, so we’ve been writing songs in the house since we were very little. Once we’d finished Uni, we decided to see if we could make a living out of being creative, musically, so we set about finding other musicians to form a band. That was the start of Little Comets with Mark (our original drummer), and Matt, our bassist.

APP: One of my favorite songs of yours is “Bridge Burn.” It’s a super special song for me and a few friends. Can you tell me a little bit about the story behind it?

RC: Ah thanks, that’s nice to hear! That’s a song I wrote in my bedroom while Mickey was mixing songs for our second album. I kind of wrote/recorded it roughly and had lots of lyrics almost immediately for it. The coast is pretty great for providing lyrical metaphors. Theme-wise, it’s just about two people who realize that their time is up. When Mickey heard the song, he really molded the landscape. Initially, it was just a B-side, but in hindsight, we probably should have put a little more faith in it, as it seems to be a pretty popular song.

APP: Your sound/genre has been described as “kitchen sink indie.” Do you agree with that?

RC: Haha, I don’t really mind–as long as people are polite and constructive, they can describe our sound how they like. I suppose that it could mean, in terms of subject matter, that we write about kitchen sink-related things, which was certainly true of album one. In a sonic sense, though, we do use a lot of percussive instruments which are also kitchenalia, so if the cap fits…

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APP: If you could invite one artist/band to be in the crowd at one of your shows, who would it be and why?

RC: We got really excited once at a gig in Oxford because somebody asked that Jonny Greenwood (Radiohead) be put on the guest list. It spoilt the gig, though, because we spent the whole evening looking for Jonny Greenwood despite him not actually being there, and probably never having any intention of being there. So I would choose Jonny Greenwood because I haven’t said “Jonny Greenwood” enough in this answer.

APP: Your latest music video, “American Tuna,” is super creative and visually complex in how it was filmed. Can you tell me a little bit about your experience filming? How did you come up with the idea as it relates to the song?

RC: It was fun, but stressful. We had received an email telling us, despite our very polite request, that we explicitly couldn’t use the building. So the whole process was based around being very secretive. This definitely hampered the final product, as we couldn’t redo shots or control timing or lighting. Mickey was in a Paternoster lift in an 18-floor building with the camera. As the lift travels up, each floor is a different scene which tells the story of a relationship. Mickey was in that lift for about 6 solid hours while we chased him ’round the building, doing scenes in non-chronological order to avoid security cameras. We were happy with the final video, but I just wish that people could see the levels of effort and time that just three people were involved in executing. It looks pretty pro, and the DIYness doesn’t come through. I think that given the constraints, it’s amazing. But I’m biased.

APP: That’s mind-blowing. Writing music is super different from filming a visual interpretation of a song through a music video. Has that ever been a challenge for you as a band?

RC:  I think we’ve learned to separate the processes quite naturally. We also like learning new skills, so the challenge of making a video or a piece of artwork is an opportunity to do that. The only problem is time. We are three people, yet we have to record, write, and release the music on our own label, then promote it whilst making the videos and artwork. Because we are novices in many of these areas, it takes us longer to produce these assets. That often puts us behind, as artists at a commensurate level have teams of people and pools of financial resources that we don’t. It does make the task psychologically difficult at times as well, compounded by the fact that we are in a industry that gives credence to having a machine in tow. We often get overlooked and dismissed because we don’t have a manager, record label, publisher, art director, plugging team etc. I think this is where the real challenge lies for us.

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APP: You haven’t toured for two years, but you’re making plans to head back onto the road soon! Do you have a favorite/funny memory from being on tour in the past?

RC: Probably when Matt broke his foot in Texas. We spent the next five days telling him he was fine, but then talking privately about how he was really hamming it up. By the time we got to Missouri, he got an X-ray and found out he had a hairline fracture. We felt TERRIBLE! He completed the rest of the tour perched on a bar stool during the gigs, and he became my hero.

APP: Are there any songs you feel you’ve outgrown that now seem to stray from your current sound?

RC: Ah no, they are all our babies. They popped out for a reason and we can’t really turn them away even when they become slightly haggard/annoying. That would be bad song parenting!

 

Thanks for taking the time to chat with me, Rob!

Listen to Little Comets here:

 

2018 Concert Recap

2018 was a great year for new records and live shows. Here’s a little recap of the concerts I attended in 2018!

George Ezra: 5/8/18, Roseland Theater

Processed with VSCO with hb1 presetI saw UK artist George Ezra perform in a small, local venue in Portland long before the success of his breakout single, “Budapest” in 2014. His booming, distinctive voice stuck with me after the performance, and I instantly became a fan. I won tickets to this concert in May through a contest his label created. I participated in various “fan activities” like watching George’s music videos multiple times, tweeting about him, and sharing his social media pages. I earned “points” that translated into number of entries, and I was my city’s winner! The concert was amazing–George played a full set of songs from both his debut record, Wanted On a Voyage and sophomore album, Staying at Tamara’s. I was thrilled when George performed my most favorite song of his, “Song 6.” This is a bonus track that appears on the deluxe edition of Wanted On a Voyage. It was magic to watch George perform it. Purple and blue lights on stage swirled around him as he sang, his eyes closed the whole time. I MAY have gotten a little emotional… 😉

Lucy Dacus: 5/26/18, Bloodworks Live Studio

Lucy, an indie rock/alternative singer-songwriter from Virginia, captured her audience from the very first song, “Night Shift.” (From her latest album, Historian.) Instantly, it became my favorite track. It tells a story of raw heartbreak and the conflicting feelings partners feel amidst the aftermath of a breakup. Immediately, Lucy reminded me of a few other of my favorite artists, like Phoebe Bridgers (whom she has performed with) and Courtney Barnett. Like these artists, she also seems to follow the “talk-singing” style, which reminds me a lot of when people read poetry out loud. I had the opportunity to meet her after the show, and she was so kind! (I’m not going to include the meet and greet picture here though, I look awful lol.) If you ever get the chance to see Lucy live, definitely check her out!

Dermot Kennedy: 5/27/18, Bloodworks Live Studio

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Dermot Kennedy, an R&B/alternative singer-songwriter from Dublin, Ireland, was the most unique artist I saw live in 2018. According to his online bio, “the young Dubliner draws inspiration from all the moments of brightness and darkness this world has to offer, crafting music that’s at once soaring and intimate, stripped-back and explosive. Stuttery hip-hop and R&B-influenced percussion underpins his weathered vocals as he combines organic and electronic elements into an arresting, emotional blend that calls to mind the adventurous arrangements of Bon Iver, and James Blake.” Dermot is a huge fan of Glen Hansard, another favorite of mine, who he ran into by chance on the streets of Dublin. A few months later, Glen invited Dermot to open for him on stage at a huge Christmas show! Dermot had a crazy strong stage presence when I saw him, and his voice really bounced off of the walls in the small studio. He mostly performed tracks from his 2017 EP, Doves and Ravens, plus  his most memorable song, “Young & Free.”

Death Cab For Cutie: 9/24/18, Hult Center

I’ve been listening to Death Cab since I was little, so when my friend offered me his extra concert ticket, of course I said yes! DCFC put on a great show, and engaged the crowd in between every song. It was so fun to hear some old classics in addition to new, like “Soul Meets Body,” which I’ve listened to forever, but also “Gold Rush,” from their latest record Thank You for Today.

Hozier: 10/20/18, Roseland Theater

Hozier played this Portland venue two nights in a row, and I caught the second show. My friend and I are both huge fans of Hozier, so naturally we lined up early and ended up being in the front row. (While waiting in line, we pressed our ears against the doors and could hear him soundchecking inside.) It was insane–standing that close to Andrew (Hozier’s real name) and his band was a dream come true. He started off the show with his hit single, “Nina Cried Power,” which I wrote about in an earlier post. Hozier also graced us with what was an unreleased track at the time, “Movement.” Andrew was accompanied by his incredible band which is composed of some insanely talented musicians from all over the globe, including Kristen Rodgers (backing vocals, percussion, keyboard) and Suzanne Santo (fiddle, guitar, vocals) from Ohio. Suzanne first sang with Hozier as part of the alt-country-blues duo, Honey Honey, when they joined him to perform Work Song at a benefit concert in May 2017.

 

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Concerts I’m attending in 2019 (so far):

The 1975, 4/27/19: This will be my third time seeing my favorite band, and I’m ecstatic! I’m crossing my fingers that they play a mixture of new and old material, especially a few of my favorite songs, like “Robbers,” “Paris,” “If I Believe You,” and “Inside Your Mind.” Each time I’ve seen The 1975, they sweep me off my feet. I completely forget where I am, and I get lost in the music. Matty and the boys put on an incredible show, and they always come through with a stellar stage setup.

Bad Suns, 3/1/19: This will be my first time seeing Bad Suns live, and I’m really looking forward to it. I’ve been listening to them for a few years now– they were the first record I was gifted when I received my first record player for Christmas a few years back.

 

See you in 2019, fellow music lovers!

(All photos, videos and gifs are mine.)

 

Now Playing: Winter 2017

I’ve been listening to a lot of chilling (pun intended–it’s cold as heck outside) tunes lately, and I wanted to share a few of them with you. Enjoy, and please tweet me any suggestions you have!

Wolf_Alice_-_Visions_of_a_LifeWolf Alice: Visions Of a Life

I initially discovered this record when I saw Wolf Alice live for the first time in Portland a few months ago. I was immediately intrigued by lead singer Ellie Rowsell’s chilling voice–Courtney Barnett meets Dolores O’Riordan. My favorite tracks from the record are “Don’t Delete The Kisses” and “Planet Hunter.” I’ve been annoying my roommates by playing these two earworms over and over. Both tracks are drastically different from each other. One is a longing, soft ballad and the other is a loud, poem-esque sing-along that is guaranteed to get suck in your head. This album is fairly new–it was just released in September.

 

Kodaline: I Wouldn’t Be EP

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I’ve been obsessed with this EP, lately. Although it came out in October, I didn’t hear about it’s release until one of the tracks popped up on my Spotify recommended. And thank goodness it did, because I’ve had the track, “I Wouldn’t Be” on repeat, since. This little ditty is sung in the style of an Irish ballad–complete with bagpipes and bone-chilling harmonies. (Seriously, you’ve gotta listen to it.) The rest of the EP is fabulous as well. My other favorite is “The Riddle.” Truly some of Kodaline’s best work.

 

James McAlister, Bryce Dessner, Sufjan Stevens & Nico Muhly: Planetarium

Planetarium-web-1497014950Maybe it’s because I’ve been watching too much Stranger Things, complete with it’s excellent 80’s soundtrack. Or maybe because of my friends’ recent re-interest in The Police and Corey Heart…but for some reason, I am SO into synthesizers right now…and 80’s/ambient music in general. Which is why Planetarium has become a favorite of mine. The electric guitar solos, spacey riffs, unique tones, and  feedback included on each track makes the whole album quite an experience to listen to. My favorite tune by far on the record is “Mercury.” Check it out–each song is named after a planet.

 

Swimming Tapes: Soft Sea Blue EP

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The perfect study soundtrack. Chill, honeyed vocals paired with lush guitar tones. My favorite track off this EP, which was released in September, is “Allison.” Swimming Tapes, an up-and-coming U.K. band has only released two EPs and a few singles so far, and I’m super excited to hear what they do next!

 

 

 

Happy Holidays, music-lovers around the world. 🙂

5 Haunting Songs On My iPod

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(Photo by Nan Palmero)

Songs that give you goosebumps are the best kind. Sometimes they’re so well-written, they make you shiver. Or maybe they just speak to you, relating to your exact situation.

In this post, I’m going to focus on those types of songs that stick in your mind even after you’ve finished listening… the haunting, weird ones. I picked the most eerie songs I could find off my iPod, and compiled them below. Enjoy!

1. Transylvania–McFly

This is a chilling song about death, betrayal and love. It follows the true story of Anne Boleyn, who was Queen of England in the 1500s. Her husband, King Henry VIII, had her put to death after finding out about the hidden, romantic relationship she shared with a peasant. This song reminds me a bit of Bohemian Rhapsody–the chorus is powerful and loud, and the song tells a compelling (and weird) story.

2. Riding To New York–Passenger

This somber, somewhat gloomy song is told from the perspective of a man (Passenger) who meets a frail, aging man riding to New York from Minnesota by bike. The man admits that he’s suffering with emotional and physical pain–he’s just found out he has lung cancer, and wants to reconnect with his broken family he’s lost touch with before he passes away. I love this song. It reminds you never to take your life for granted.

3. The Lost Boy–Greg Holden

You may have heard this song featured in season 5 of Sons of Anarchy. According to Entertainment Weekly, “‘The Lost Boy’ is a eulogy for a fallen character, but the song was actually inspired by Dave Eggers’ novel What Is The What, about a group of Sudanese refugees. ‘If you listen to the lyrics, it’s not like you’d know that it was about a Sudanese refugee,’ Greg Holden tells EW. ‘I know what it’s about, but I’m really glad people are able to take their own meanings from it. I like it when songs have more meanings than just the one that was intended, so I’m glad that people were able to relate to it through Sons of Anarchy.'”

I met Greg Holden a few weeks ago, and heard him perform a few of his songs off his debut album. Although he didn’t perform this one, most of his songs were similar–each held a deeper meaning, and shed light on common social, as well as emotional issues.

4. Bronte–Gotye

This song is pretty hypnotizing from the very beginning, and Gotye wrote it about something you might not expect–a dog. It’s based off a true story about his friend who was putting down his 21-year-old dog Bronte. Gotye explained in an interview with Artist Direct: “When you love and care for an animal, you don’t want it to suffer too much. You also respect nature and the natural cause of things. They really struggled with the eventual decision of deciding they had to let go of the dog and put it down. I thought they did it in a very loving way. From what I could tell, it was very instructive and inclusive for their daughters. They did it as a family. I wrote that song like I was vicariously experiencing it. That’s what I’m proud of. In its simplicity, I felt like it captured my feelings of that experience even if it was at a distance. You don’t have to necessarily interpret it as a relationship between people and animals.”

5. Antichrist–The 1975

The 1975 have never performed this song live, possibly because of how controversial it is. Matty Healy, the lead singer, has said it’s their band manager’s favorite song, and that he is always is encouraging the band to perform it live. Matty says this song is really personal, and one of his favorites they’ve written–it represents the fact that he often wishes he was religious so that he had something to believe in, but is however, an atheist. The lyrics in this song are incredibly well-written, with such great imagery. One of my favorites.

HOW TO: Create a Music Time Capsule

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 presetLike I’ve said so many times before on my blog, music/songs can represent memories. Listening to a specific song can bring back so many good memories from various times in your life!

For this post, I decided to do a something a little different. I’m a very sentimental person, and I also absolutely love time capsules. I have so many hidden around my house–one from kindergarten that I’m supposed to open when I graduate from college, one for when I graduate from high school, and one I’m set to open in just a few weeks. Because I love time capsules so much, I decided to combine my love of memorabilia with my passion for music & its power to spark memories.

In this post, I’m going to show you how to create your very own music time capsule. You can decide to open it whenever you want–during a major life milestone, next year, whatever. When you open this time capsule, it will help you remember the music you loved and the memories that you made because of it. It makes your memories a bit more tangible, and is super fun to hide, then discover later. Read on to find out how you can fossilize your favorite artists and albums.

THE IDEA: If you’ve never made a time capsule before, the idea is to find a box or some sort of container, and fill it with significant objects that will spark memories when you open it years later. Ideally, you are supposed forget what’s in the box until you open it. Decide on a specific date or a certain year that you would like to open it, and mark it on the outside, then HIDE IT. Don’t open it, touch it, or peek until your target date.

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9 ideas of what to put inside:

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset1. Tickets from past concerts.

Collect tickets from a few (or one) of the best concerts you’ve attended. On the back, write who went to the concert with you. That way, you can call your friend and reminisce about that perfect night after you open your capsule.

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset2. Concert & festival bracelets.

These are so much fun to look at years later. Try to save them instead of throwing them away after the concert/festival you attended. I kept my V.I.P. bracelet from when I met The Wanted.

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset3. A lotion or small lip gloss that you wore the night of your favorite concert.

Scent evokes strong memories. One sniff of a perfume that you wore the night you met your favorite band will transport you right back to the moment you finally hugged them.

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset4. Pictures, pictures, pictures!

Throw in pictures you snapped of your favorite singer on stage, at meet-and-greets, and of you and your friends after/during concerts. One thing that’s super fun to include: Pictures of your reactions after a concert, or after meeting your favorite band/singer. Make it habit to snap a picture of you and your friends after each concert–you’ll have genuine smiles and you’ll capture the excitement of the night on camera. (In the picture below, on the right, you will see a picture of my friend and me after we met Ed Sheeran. We were a little excited…)

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset5. Buttons, stickers, articles and other mementos.

Cut out an article of an interview or photo shoot with favorite singer, and include it in your time capsule. You’ll love reading it years later, and it will help you remember why you loved that particular artist so much. Stickers, buttons and notes are always fun to look at, too.

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset6. Albums, album booklets, or a flash drive.

In 10 years, or whenever you decide to open this time capsule, the world may not be using CDs anymore. Putting your favorite album on a flash drive is probably good idea. If you want, though, go ahead and include a whole CD (if you can fit it inside).

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset7. Fan letters.

Make a point to scan and save letters you write to your favorite band member (before you give them away). Or you still have a letter for your fave that you hope to give them one day, consider putting it in your time capsule. (Obviously if you end up meeting the artist/band, you can still take it out and give it to them.) I scanned the letters I gave to The Wanted when I met them, and it’s fun (if a bit cringe-worthy) to read them now. 🙂

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8. A description of your favorite concert, or concert moment.

Write out your favorite concert moment, then read it out loud to someone who went to the concert with you when you take it out of your time capsule years later. Even if you’re not much of a writer, jot down some bullet points and key moments you want to remember.

Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset9. Tweets.

You know those embarrassing, adoring tweets you’ve sent to your favorite singers? Print them out! Have you ever gotten a reply? Print it out! You will LOVE seeing them years later when you open your time capsule. Plus, who knows if we will even have Twitter in the future? Your tweets will seem so “retro”!

Hope you enjoyed this post! Tweet me pictures of YOUR music time capsules! (@sophersc)

An Interview With Falling Through April

FTA 4Falling Through April

Last week, I chatted over email with a band who “blurs the lines of the most intriguing sound of rock and alternative music from the 90’s through today.” They are Falling Through April (FTA), a five-piece from Charlotte, NC. FTA has toured with The Pretty Reckless (Razor & Tie) and Adelita’s Way (Virgin), performed at the 2014 Warped Tour, and released their brand new EP “Risks And Rewards” on iTunes last January. Read on to get a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of this edgy alternative band. I asked about their inspirations, new album, and what might happen if they were to switch bodies with each other for a day!

A Perfect Playlist: How/when did the band get started?

Falling Through April (Dave): The band started in July 2011. Myself and our original vocalist, Cory, were the first two members to get this project going. We were in another band together and things were falling apart and we wanted to keep pursuing music. So we started Falling Through April.

APP: How would you describe your sound?

FTA 1FTA (Dan): Our music is like a mix of modern alternative meets 90’s alternative. We were all inspired by the incredible wave of 90’s alternative era. Bands like Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, The Offspring, Foo Fighters, Incubus, Weezer (one of our faves), etc. We’re not trying to be like any of those bands but it’s what we grew up on and listened to heavily when we first started playing our instruments.

APP: How do you become inspired to write a song?

FTA: (Dan): It depends really. I honestly have melodies and song ideas floating around my head all the time. I could be standing in line and all of a sudden I get an idea. Sometimes I write songs in the bathroom, haha. I really just depends.

APP: How did you think of the name Falling Through April for the band?

FTA 2FTA (Jim): ‘Fertility Thermometers’ was taken so we just went with the first couple of words we could put together.

APP: Who were some of your musical inspirations as kids, and who are they now?

FTA (Taylor): Jose from Incubus was a huge inspiration for me. Still is. I have a lot of respect for his style and skill.

(Dan): We have a bunch between us but people like Joe Bonamassa, Victor Wooten, Dean DeLeo, Danny Carey, Sia..too many to list.

APP: If each of you could switch bodies with someone in the band, who would switch with who and why?

FTA: (Dan): Probably…Dave. Because he’s so loud and bastardly. I want to know what it’s like to be loud and bastardly.

(Matt): Jim. For reasons we won’t speak out loud.

FTA 6APP: What is one successful song you’ve heard that you wish you would’ve written?

(Matt): None, we might not appreciate how amazing those songs are if we wrote them.

APP: Dream collab?

(Dan): Hayley Williams. So much respect for how awesome of a vocalist she is.

(Dave): Red Hot Chili Peppers.

(Taylor): Incubus.

(Jim): Alice Cooper.

(Matt): Panic! at the Disco.

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APP: Do you have any advice for bands/singers who are just starting a career in music and trying to build a fanbase?

(Dan): Hard work, hard work, hard work, and more hard work. Do not stop touring, promoting, networking, doing anything and everything you can to get your name out. If you believe in your band…and I mean really believe in your band not just hope something is going to land in your lap then you will reach your goal. Just be realistic. Treat your band like a business – if you have a bad business partner a.k.a. band mate – cut him loose. You’re only as strong as your weakest link. If someone is holding you back, you need to decide whether you want to be stuck at that level or if you want to move on.

APP: Anything else you want to say to readers of A Perfect Playlist?

(Dave): Thanks for taking the time to read through our interview. Much love to all of you. Please help spread the word and pick up a copy of our brand new EP “Risks & Rewards” out on iTunes, Amazon, etc. right now!

FTA 3

Thanks so much, guys!

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