Cassette Tape Revival

Rewind! Over the past few years, you’ve probably noticed a huge resurgence in retro music formats. Vinyl has seen 260% growth since 2009, according to Forbes magazine. These days, I constantly see teens in addition to adults digging through the vinyl crates in the record store I work in. What may have started as a Instagram-motivated fad has now adapted into a full fledged vinyl revolution, encouraging young audiophiles to re-embrace the physical side of music during this age of Spotify and Apple music.

In addition to vinyl, cassette tapes have recently made a comeback. Mainstream artists like Khalid, Lana Del Ray, Arcade Fire, and The 1975 are releasing their latest albums on vinyl, CD, and now, cassette. Urban Outfitters has started selling clear, portable cassette tape players. (Gotta admit–they’re pretty cool. Here’s a tip, though: you can get something similar at Goodwill or a thrift shop for way cheaper.) “Check out my mixtape” isn’t just a silly phrase anymore–kids are actually making tapes again. (Okay, maybe it’s still a silly phrase.)

According to The Verge, “Helping the cassette boom are a few factors. For one, the official soundtrack for Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy is still going strong, despite its 2014 release. The soundtrack, featured heavily in the movie as the personal mixtape of Chris Pratt’s character Peter Quill, sold 4,000 cassettes last year.”

FullSizeRenderIf you want to get in on the trend, you can find cassette tapes at pretty much any local record store. If you’re looking to get creative and make your own, all you need is a CD collection, tape recorder, blank cassette tapes (you can get them at Fred Meyer) and Google images. I made some pretty quirky personalized mixtapes for my friends (see right and above)–they work great as birthday presents or just random lil surprises to show you care.

It’s pretty rad how retro is constantly becoming  the new cool. What’s next, the return of 8-tracks and floppy disks? I’m all for it!

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The Vinyl Revival

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“As CD and digital sales decline in the wake of streaming services like Spotify and Pandora, record sales are on the rise. In fact, the format has seen 260% growth since 2009. While CDs sit on shelves, vinyl supply is having a hard time keeping up with demand. It may not have seemed possible 10 years ago, but vinyl is back.” —Forbes Magazine, July 2015

record playerFor Christmas this year, I got a record player. I had wanted one for months but wasn’t expecting to get one, so my parents really surprised me. It’s a Third Man Records turntable designed by Jack White, and fortunately, NOT a Crosley. (Crosley turntables tend to break within a few weeks or ruin your records with their harsh needles.) Since I started working in a record store last year, I’ve become fascinated with vinyl and the culture surrounding it.

Since receiving my first turntable, I’ve been working on expanding my record collection. So far, I own Language and Perspective by Bad Suns, Talking Is Hard by Walk the Moon, Revolver by The Beatles, For Emma, Forever Ago by Bon Iver (my favorite one to spin), 5 AM by Amber Run, Quadrophenia by The Who, Wanted On A Voyage by George Ezra, and a few of my dad’s old records. I brought my turntable with me to college after Christmas break, and it’s attracted quite a few people into my dorm room. Since most people my age listen to their favorite albums on Spotify, my turntable has become a fun, unique (and nostalgic) way to listen to music in our dorm.

I love the experience of listening to music on vinyl. The slight crackle of the needle hitting the grooves of the record before it begins is one of my favorite parts, and I absolutely love watching the record spin…especially if the record is a picture (or colored) disk, like George Ezra’s album I purchased from a Record Store Day sale. (See below.)11951563_430420080485911_916543637205630510_o

I have come to love vinyl simply because it encourages the purchase of physical, tactile music. I  believe that the act of holding your favorite record in your hands before listening to it results in a unique, and overall more meaningful connection with the music.

Over the past year or so, vinyl purchases have expedited due to the current generation of teenagers and young adults who now own their own turntables. Honestly, I think that this trend first arose due to the aesthetic, visual appeal that vinyl and turntables present…specifically for posting to social media outlets like Instagram. Many young teenagers seemed to utilize posting pictures of vinyl as a way to get likes, since not many people were listening to music that way. Although this may have been the initial case, I think that vinyl purchases among young adults has evolved into a genuine passion for music and appreciation for the physical representation of a favorite record.

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Getting lost in record stores is one of my favorite things to do. I could spend hours browsing through records and examining album covers. Now that I have my own record player, I can actually buy albums to play…which is so much fun. If you have any suggestions of records that sound great on vinyl, please feel free to tweet me!

 

Photos of me by Kendra Siebert

5 Haunting Songs On My iPod

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(Photo by Nan Palmero)

Songs that give you goosebumps are the best kind. Sometimes they’re so well-written, they make you shiver. Or maybe they just speak to you, relating to your exact situation.

In this post, I’m going to focus on those types of songs that stick in your mind even after you’ve finished listening… the haunting, weird ones. I picked the most eerie songs I could find off my iPod, and compiled them below. Enjoy!

1. Transylvania–McFly

This is a chilling song about death, betrayal and love. It follows the true story of Anne Boleyn, who was Queen of England in the 1500s. Her husband, King Henry VIII, had her put to death after finding out about the hidden, romantic relationship she shared with a peasant. This song reminds me a bit of Bohemian Rhapsody–the chorus is powerful and loud, and the song tells a compelling (and weird) story.

2. Riding To New York–Passenger

This somber, somewhat gloomy song is told from the perspective of a man (Passenger) who meets a frail, aging man riding to New York from Minnesota by bike. The man admits that he’s suffering with emotional and physical pain–he’s just found out he has lung cancer, and wants to reconnect with his broken family he’s lost touch with before he passes away. I love this song. It reminds you never to take your life for granted.

3. The Lost Boy–Greg Holden

You may have heard this song featured in season 5 of Sons of Anarchy. According to Entertainment Weekly, “‘The Lost Boy’ is a eulogy for a fallen character, but the song was actually inspired by Dave Eggers’ novel What Is The What, about a group of Sudanese refugees. ‘If you listen to the lyrics, it’s not like you’d know that it was about a Sudanese refugee,’ Greg Holden tells EW. ‘I know what it’s about, but I’m really glad people are able to take their own meanings from it. I like it when songs have more meanings than just the one that was intended, so I’m glad that people were able to relate to it through Sons of Anarchy.'”

I met Greg Holden a few weeks ago, and heard him perform a few of his songs off his debut album. Although he didn’t perform this one, most of his songs were similar–each held a deeper meaning, and shed light on common social, as well as emotional issues.

4. Bronte–Gotye

This song is pretty hypnotizing from the very beginning, and Gotye wrote it about something you might not expect–a dog. It’s based off a true story about his friend who was putting down his 21-year-old dog Bronte. Gotye explained in an interview with Artist Direct: “When you love and care for an animal, you don’t want it to suffer too much. You also respect nature and the natural cause of things. They really struggled with the eventual decision of deciding they had to let go of the dog and put it down. I thought they did it in a very loving way. From what I could tell, it was very instructive and inclusive for their daughters. They did it as a family. I wrote that song like I was vicariously experiencing it. That’s what I’m proud of. In its simplicity, I felt like it captured my feelings of that experience even if it was at a distance. You don’t have to necessarily interpret it as a relationship between people and animals.”

5. Antichrist–The 1975

The 1975 have never performed this song live, possibly because of how controversial it is. Matty Healy, the lead singer, has said it’s their band manager’s favorite song, and that he is always is encouraging the band to perform it live. Matty says this song is really personal, and one of his favorites they’ve written–it represents the fact that he often wishes he was religious so that he had something to believe in, but is however, an atheist. The lyrics in this song are incredibly well-written, with such great imagery. One of my favorites.

My Favorite Album Covers

I love album artwork. I’m a very visual person, so if an album cover looks cool to me, it’s likely that I’ll pick it up and check out the music. I work at a CD/record store, so I spend a lot of time browsing through interesting CD and vinyl covers. One of the main reasons I love buying CDs & having physical copies of my favorite music is because of the artwork. Here are a few of my favorite album covers!

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1. U2–Rattle And Hum

2. Capital Cities —Inatidal Wave Of Mystery

3. Passenger–Whispers

4. Guster–Ganging Up On the Sun

5. The Who–Quadrophenia

6. Led Zeppelin–Led Zeppelin IV

7. Oasis–What’s the Story Morning Glory?

8. War Kites–Skinny Dipping In the Koi Pond

Ever wondered where the picture on your favorite album cover was taken? If you want to see 10 classic album covers in Google Street view, click here! It’s super cool.